What is the Cost to Build a Storage Shed?
Mar14

What is the Cost to Build a Storage Shed?

One way to increase your home’s value is to build a shed. Besides, it also gives you additional storage space. Not only can you build one to your specifications and needs, but should you ever sell your home, the cost of the shed can be recovered. But what is the cost to build a storage shed? Let’s look at some important factors. What to consider when building a shed There are a few things to consider when you want to build a shed, such as: Determine if you can build a shed on your property as some towns do not allow you to have an extra structure on your property. Be very sure of the size of your intended shed, what you plan to store there and whether you want to have it insulated and electrically fitted. How much does it cost to build a shed? Depending on the size and style of a conventional wooden shed, the price will be calculated. For instance, if you want a plain vanilla wooden shed with walls measuring 8 feet, it will cost you between $35 and $45 per square foot. This will give you a door, a couple of windows, a ramp and a roof. If you also choose to have extra windows, a barn door, a particular kind of roof and finished interiors, you should be prepared to pay about $70 per square foot. Of course, since these are the rates for a smaller sized shed, if you’re looking for a 12 x 16 shed cost, you’ll have to shell out considerably more. A custom or prefabricated storage shed is usually 10 feet x 12 feet. It can be constructed as a DIY project if you have some knowledge of carpentry and the required skills, or you can hand it over to a professional. If you’re going to electrify it, all the more you should hand it over to an electrician. Read related article here: How to build a lean-to shed? Storage shed kits Wood isn’t the only material that you can use to make your shed, you can consider buying a kit too. Kits contain everything pre-cut and all you need to do is to assemble them. Any homeowner can put this kit together. You can choose to have a kit in wood, plastic, metal, vinyl or PVC. These sheds, however, aren’t as long-lasting as traditional wood sheds, but they save you money. If you buy a kit, you should pay between $500 and $1000. These kits can limit you in size, not being more than 8 feet x 8 feet. If a professional assembles this for you, you...

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Which Is The Best Food Safe Wood Finish?
Mar12

Which Is The Best Food Safe Wood Finish?

Woodworkers are always looking for food safe wood finish for the items they make in this category. They are worried that the food bowls and crockery they create aren’t food safe and that they need some reliable finish that would protect the wood and not be toxic to the user. Most finishes are considered toxic and unsafe for our consumption when in the liquid state due to the presence of certain solvents that take the finish either on the surface of the wood or penetrates it. However, it is generally believed that once the finish has matured and reached its final state, it is food safe, so direct contact with food is absolutely safe. To accept this position, it is necessary to determine which finish we are talking about. Are we considering a finish that forms a film on the wood surface? Or, one that penetrates the wood? Food safe wood finishes: You can safely use wood finishes such as polyurethane, shellac, lacquer or varnish on wood food utensils that won’t be subject to damage. For cutting boards or salad bowls where using a film finish might damage these crockery pieces, it’s best to go with a penetrating oil finish. Your food bowls can be considered safe once the carrier solvents on them completely leaves the finish and the surface is totally dry. In the case of polyurethane, for example, a woodworker should ensure that this finish should completely bond together and lose their content of carrier solvents. By this means, polyurethane should allow soluble finishes like lacquer and shellac to completely evaporate their solvents. Types of food safe finishes: Walnut Oil Wood Finish: This is the ideal food safe wood finish because it is an entirely natural oil and a drying oil too. This means that once you apply it, it will dry, unlike other oils which could turn rancid. When you use this oil on wood, it gets absorbed by the wood and does not make the wood sticky. Also, it has no smell of its own, but it enriches the wood with every coat. You can use it on wooden utensils like spoons, bowls, servers, salad hands, etc. Its finish is non-toxic, and water- and alcohol-resistant. Its aroma is also very pleasing and it does not give any aftertaste to the food. Mineral Oil Wood Finish: This oil is derived from petroleum, yet it is odorless, tasteless and colorless, apart from completely inert. Like walnut oil, mineral oil too is a good option for food utensils because here too, the oil has no smell of its own and dries up after applying it. It is very...

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7 Ways To Remove Black Mold On Wood
Feb17

7 Ways To Remove Black Mold On Wood

In general, homeowners know that it isn’t good to have black mold on wood in their homes, but few people are well-informed enough to know exactly how harmful it can be to them. It is therefore a good idea to monitor your home and check that there aren’t any surprise mold growths, particularly if you live in a humid environment. What is black mold? Toxic black mold flourishes in warm and humid environments, particularly after it has rained heavily or is wet and not dried completely. It usually grows in the basement, bathroom or kitchen or any area exposed to water as in a leak from below the sink in the kitchen or bathroom. Toxic black mold is better known as Stachybotrys chartarum and is extremely dangerous to human beings. It is said to be toxic because it produces toxins known as mycotoxins. Recognizing toxic black mold: It is greenish-black in color and gelatinous in texture with a slimy layer on the surface. What are the symptoms of reaction to black mold? Among the most common risks and health effects of mold are allergies. Some of the most common allergy symptoms of mold include runny nose, wheezing, rash, itchy and watery eyes, redness of the eyes and coughing. Mold also irritates the airways and eyes and skin and causes fever and respiratory problems. Those with low immune systems or chronic lung disease can develop serious lung infections due to mold allergy. Other reactions to black mold include damage to internal organs, mental damage, exhaustion and nausea. In extreme cases, it can also be fatal. How to remove black mold on wood There are many ways of killing black mold that appears on wood. Here are some of them: After cleaning the mildew of its spores, using a vacuum cleaner with a hose, soft brush and HEPA filter will go a long way to get rid of loose spores. Throw all the spores into a plastic bag and put it in your trash can. You can also wash wood with water and a washcloth. Spray the water on the affected parts and rub vigorously with the cloth. Wipe with a paper towel. To get rid of mold on outdoor wooden furniture, rinse it with a garden hose and wipe it dry with a sponge so that no dirt or dust remains. You can also use a solution of dishwashing detergent and warm water and apply it to your wooden furniture. Brush it vigorously with a scrub. If it persists, make a vinegar solution and apply it to your stubborn mold stains. Sanding the wood is another way of getting rid of...

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4 Disadvantages Of Rough Sawn Lumber And How You Can Work Around It
Feb13

4 Disadvantages Of Rough Sawn Lumber And How You Can Work Around It

Though you may have heard the term ‘rough sawn lumber,’ it’s quite likely that you don’t really know what that means. So, let’s define it. Really, this refers to lumber that isn’t yet finished before it’s shipped to be sold. It is kept rough intentionally and must be dried, planed or dressed as the recipient wishes. What exactly happens is that lumber when processed at a mill, sawing it of its roughness is an early step at a time when the boards of the tree haven’t been planed or dried. It continues to be green when shipped, proving that it has neither dried nor cured. So, it will shrink later as it contains 20% water and must be dried under the sun before use. Because it is yet to shrink, it is larger than its finished counterpart, leaving enough room for planing and smoothing. People prefer to by this lumber as it’s relatively inexpensive and it allows them to have greater control. Advantages of using rough sawn lumber: This lumber is usually sold cheaper than finished lumber. It is also thicker than finished wood. It allows the woodworker to have enough wood for a good margin of error, while also saving money. DIY woodworkers and hobbyists prefer rough sawn lumber for their projects as it is economical and they can work with quality wood. It is ideal for a large spectrum of furniture-making. Since it isn’t milled, this kind of wood can give a really rustic feel. This type of wood creates less of an environmental impact since it is only air-dried. Usually, exotic woods that bear rich hues and designs are always rough sawn.  Disadvantages of using rough sawn lumber: It is difficult to work with. It needs to be milled before use. Care must be taken to buy it before it dries completely. Professionals at the lumber mill should let you know if the wood you buy needs to be stacked, interspersed with sticks for drying, or if they need to be kept erect. This means that you can’t work with this wood immediately but only after all the moisture leaves it. Finding a distributor: Your first point of contact to source rough sawn lumber is your local woodworkers’ association. They will recommend distributors and dealers who will give you the lumber you want. Choosing the best rough sawn lumber: Rough sawn lumber needs a lot preparation before it can be used for woodworking projects. Usually, lumber cuts of two-by-four are taken which translate into 1.5 inches x 3.5 inches. To begin, your tool kit and carpentry skills should be ready to use. The advantage of buying this...

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How To Make A Recurve Bow
Feb03

How To Make A Recurve Bow

People interested in learning how to make a recurve bow often do it to save money by making it themselves, while others prefer to have a customized bow. Whatever your reasons may be, making your own bow is sure to teach you a lot about archery. Prepare yourself: First, get to know the different parts of a recurve bow. For this, look for plans and diagrams that show you how to build your own recurve bow. You can get these online or at a local store or you can find them in a self-help kit. You would need the following to build your own recurve bow: Jigsaw Sander Clamps Bow String Wood glue Measuring tape Paint and Paint Brush The basics: These days, recurve bows are made of fibreglass and laminated wood, with the wood acting as the divider between two laminated sheets of fibreglass. The fibreglass, however, takes on the load of carrying the maximum amount of load while the wooden part carries not more than 10% of the load. If you increase the space between the fibreglass and go in for a thicker wooden core, the bow’s strength will automatically increase. It is important to note here that as the wooden core’s thickness doubles, automatically the bow’s weight quadruples. How to prepare the bow: A recurve bow is one up on the traditional bow because it can throw arrows much farther off than a traditional bow, and with greater force. It may take a lot of skill to make a perfect recurve bow, so it’s good to get started now. Your bow will be shaped from a wooden stave. It should be of the same length as your bow and should be made from strong, malleable and flexible wood. Good choices are maple, hickory, lemonwood and yew. You will need a bow shaping frame, a hatchet, a large file, a vice grip, a tillering stick, a heat gun, a draw knife and a few screw clamps. Make the outline of the limbs and arrow. Ensure that the stave is in standing position and with the help of your hatchet, smoothen the stave as much as you can. While marking, take care that you have the sizes your need of flat and narrow limbs. Choose the position of the handle now. Make sure that the stave bends by laying its bottom tip against your Make sure it will bend by putting the bottom tip against the arch of your foot. Hold the upper end of the bow using one hand and pull the back closer to you. However, don’t pull too much as your stave could be badly...

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15 Easy DIY 2×4 Woodworking Projects
Jan17

15 Easy DIY 2×4 Woodworking Projects

One solid reason why 2x4s are popular is that they are easily available for woodworking projects. This makes them inexpensive to buy and easy to work with. Imagine, they can easily be cut into small pieces or used to make projects of different sizes including furniture. An important factor you should know about 2x4s is that they don’t measure 2×4. In fact, when you see them at home improvement stores, you will find that they measure 6′ x 12′; 2″ thick and 4″ wide in their natural state. After milling, their size is reduced to 1½” x 3½”. Despite this, it’s equally important to know that working on 2x4s are a budget-friendly way of starting out in woodworking. They are also simple to work with, which could be very encouraging for newcomers. However, before you get into building 2×4 projects, bear this in mind: Use your planer and jointer to flatten your wood and ensure it’s absolutely square. You need to do this as the 2x4s you see at timber yards are often twisted and warped, which doesn’t give you good furniture. Uses: 2×4 is generally used to make furniture, but it is also used to make cupboards, and on floors and walls.  It is cheap to buy and is available in sizes of 6 feet-10 feet, which you can easily chop off after use. Here are 15 Easy DIY 2×4 Woodworking Projects that you could start off with: Modern Bench: You can build this practical bench very easily. Begin by tailoring the 2x4s down to the size w anted and hold it together with adhesive and clamps. Once you’ve stained and sealed it, your bench will be one that you can sit on indoors and outdoors. Bar Stools: You can create your own bar stools in 2×4 and assemble them using lap joints. The finished look is sharper than most stools you’d find in any store, and with these you choose the height, dimensions, and stain. And here’s another kind of bar stool which allows for a lot of sawing. You can create a three-legged bar stool that comprises a trio of 2x4s, eight feet long, that are turned into slim leggy bar stools. Wood strips are stuck together to make seats and after staining, the wood grain stands out effectively. Giant Jenga: It’s easy to build a table-top Jenga, despite its small size. Here, instead of making a small table-top, you can build a set of giant Jenga pieces with the help of 2x4s. Only, remember to sand them down and make them all of the same size. Sawhorses: If you’re a woodworking hobbyist or a professional,...

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