How To Bleach Wood Floors – Tips and Guidance
Jun22

How To Bleach Wood Floors – Tips and Guidance

When your hardwood floor shows up stubborn stains that just won’t go no matter what you try, bleaching it becomes a good option. To bleach wood floors, there are three commonly used methods: chlorine bleach, oxalic acid or a two-part kit containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hydroxide. You can choose a method from these three based on their staining composition. Perhaps you are aware that chlorine bleach is the weakest of them all and is good for ink stains, juice spills, etc. Oxalic acid works well black discoloration caused due to age, rust stains and water damage. Lastly, a peroxide two-part bleach kit is the strongest of these three and is used only as a last resort. How to bleach wood: Chlorine Bleach: To know how to bleach wood floors using chlorine bleach, follow these steps: #1: Begin by sanding the floor so that any existing finish is removed. If the stains are very stubborn, use a chemical stripper to take off the stains. #2: In a plastic container, mix hot water and dry calcium or sodium hypochlorite. If you prefer, you can use liquid chlorine bleach that’s used in homes by pouring two teaspoons of it at a time to the surface that needs staining. Use either this calcium-sodium mix or household bleach to the wood and stain it, and brush it with a stiff-toothed brush. After 10 minutes, wipe it away with a soft rag. If you still find stains, let the bleach remain for another 24 hours. #3: Wipe off any left-over bleach using a soft rag. Drizzle 1/4 cup vinegar on the damaged area to get rid of the effects of the bleach and rinse with water. Don’t use too much of liquid as this might cause the wood to distend. Wipe off the extra water immediately and let the stained area dry overnight. Oxalic Acid: To know how to bleach wood floors using oxalic acid, follow these steps: #4: Sand your hardwood floor or use a chemical stripper to get the finish off it. Wipe it clean and dry before you apply oxalic acid. Dissolve 0.06 liters (2 oz.) of oxalic acid in a liter of very hot water in a plastic container. #5: Using stiff-toothed brush, brush this liquid onto the floor and let it remain until it shows signs of lightening. If necessary, reapply it and scrub again with the brush. With a soft rag, wipe away the excess oxalic acid solution when the stain lightens. Add a rinse of 1/4 cup vinegar and then wipe dry and follow it up with a water rinse so that the entire surface area is...

Read More
Choosing The Best Wood Shingle Roof
May15

Choosing The Best Wood Shingle Roof

Before the 19th century, wooden shingles was split by the hand and they were almost always planed or knifed smooth to become very thin and very narrow. When the steam-powered sawmills came in, in the 19th century, shingle fabrication was revolutionized. Prior to the arrival of asphalt, wood roofs were the most common shedding roof system used. Wood shingles are still one of the most common roofing materials used in North America where several types of wood get used. Here is how to choose the type of wood shingle that best suit you: When it comes to choosing roof shingles for a new home or new shingles for replacing an old roof it can become a challenge as there are so many different types of shingles to choose from. The roof of a house is meant to last a very long time and once it is on top of the house there is no turning back. The roof of a house should give protection and add character. For roof shingles, there are various materials to choose from such as wood, flagstone, slate, fiber cement, plastic, metal, and composite material such as asphalt shingles. Many people like the traditional look that wood gives to their house and over time as the wood ages, the color will change slightly and some people feel that this adds, even more, character to their home. Another good reason for using wood is because it can help you regulate the temperature in your house. Some wood types offer better insulation power over others while still allowing the attic good ventilation. For a roof structure made from wood, you can choose between wood shingles or wood shakes. Wood shingles are thinner, sawn smooth on both sides and narrowed out, giving them a more tailored appearance that is used for both roofing and sidewalls. However, shingles are less durable than shakes. Shingles come in a uniform size, but the color, thickness, cut and pattern of the wood can differ, giving you the opportunity to be unique. Wood shingles are also easy to make and get rid of when you need a roof replacement because wood is a natural resource, renewable and biodegradable. Wood shakes, however, used for centuries, have a rough look, as they are split from logs and often left split for the effect. The method of splitting the shakes and not sawing ensures straight-grained pieces only, making them stronger and less likely to warp. Shakes resist water penetration better than shingles. Just like shingles comes in various materials, wood shingles can be formed from various wood materials. Some roof shingles can even be recycled, depending on...

Read More
What is the Cost to Build a Storage Shed?
Mar14

What is the Cost to Build a Storage Shed?

One way to increase your home’s value is to build a shed. Besides, it also gives you additional storage space. Not only can you build one to your specifications and needs, but should you ever sell your home, the cost of the shed can be recovered. But what is the cost to build a storage shed? Let’s look at some important factors. What to consider when building a shed There are a few things to consider when you want to build a shed, such as: Determine if you can build a shed on your property as some towns do not allow you to have an extra structure on your property. Be very sure of the size of your intended shed, what you plan to store there and whether you want to have it insulated and electrically fitted. How much does it cost to build a shed? Depending on the size and style of a conventional wooden shed, the price will be calculated. For instance, if you want a plain vanilla wooden shed with walls measuring 8 feet, it will cost you between $35 and $45 per square foot. This will give you a door, a couple of windows, a ramp and a roof. If you also choose to have extra windows, a barn door, a particular kind of roof and finished interiors, you should be prepared to pay about $70 per square foot. Of course, since these are the rates for a smaller sized shed, if you’re looking for a 12 x 16 shed cost, you’ll have to shell out considerably more. A custom or prefabricated storage shed is usually 10 feet x 12 feet. It can be constructed as a DIY project if you have some knowledge of carpentry and the required skills, or you can hand it over to a professional. If you’re going to electrify it, all the more you should hand it over to an electrician. Read related article here: How to build a lean-to shed? Storage shed kits Wood isn’t the only material that you can use to make your shed, you can consider buying a kit too. Kits contain everything pre-cut and all you need to do is to assemble them. Any homeowner can put this kit together. You can choose to have a kit in wood, plastic, metal, vinyl or PVC. These sheds, however, aren’t as long-lasting as traditional wood sheds, but they save you money. If you buy a kit, you should pay between $500 and $1000. These kits can limit you in size, not being more than 8 feet x 8 feet. If a professional assembles this for you, you...

Read More
Which Is The Best Food Safe Wood Finish?
Mar12

Which Is The Best Food Safe Wood Finish?

Woodworkers are always looking for food safe wood finish for the items they make in this category. They are worried that the food bowls and crockery they create aren’t food safe and that they need some reliable finish that would protect the wood and not be toxic to the user. Most finishes are considered toxic and unsafe for our consumption when in the liquid state due to the presence of certain solvents that take the finish either on the surface of the wood or penetrates it. However, it is generally believed that once the finish has matured and reached its final state, it is food safe, so direct contact with food is absolutely safe. To accept this position, it is necessary to determine which finish we are talking about. Are we considering a finish that forms a film on the wood surface? Or, one that penetrates the wood? Food safe wood finishes: You can safely use wood finishes such as polyurethane, shellac, lacquer or varnish on wood food utensils that won’t be subject to damage. For cutting boards or salad bowls where using a film finish might damage these crockery pieces, it’s best to go with a penetrating oil finish. Your food bowls can be considered safe once the carrier solvents on them completely leaves the finish and the surface is totally dry. In the case of polyurethane, for example, a woodworker should ensure that this finish should completely bond together and lose their content of carrier solvents. By this means, polyurethane should allow soluble finishes like lacquer and shellac to completely evaporate their solvents. Types of food safe finishes: Walnut Oil Wood Finish: This is the ideal food safe wood finish because it is an entirely natural oil and a drying oil too. This means that once you apply it, it will dry, unlike other oils which could turn rancid. When you use this oil on wood, it gets absorbed by the wood and does not make the wood sticky. Also, it has no smell of its own, but it enriches the wood with every coat. You can use it on wooden utensils like spoons, bowls, servers, salad hands, etc. Its finish is non-toxic, and water- and alcohol-resistant. Its aroma is also very pleasing and it does not give any aftertaste to the food. Mineral Oil Wood Finish: This oil is derived from petroleum, yet it is odorless, tasteless and colorless, apart from completely inert. Like walnut oil, mineral oil too is a good option for food utensils because here too, the oil has no smell of its own and dries up after applying it. It is very...

Read More
7 Ways To Remove Black Mold On Wood
Feb17

7 Ways To Remove Black Mold On Wood

In general, homeowners know that it isn’t good to have black mold on wood in their homes, but few people are well-informed enough to know exactly how harmful it can be to them. It is therefore a good idea to monitor your home and check that there aren’t any surprise mold growths, particularly if you live in a humid environment. What is black mold? Toxic black mold flourishes in warm and humid environments, particularly after it has rained heavily or is wet and not dried completely. It usually grows in the basement, bathroom or kitchen or any area exposed to water as in a leak from below the sink in the kitchen or bathroom. Toxic black mold is better known as Stachybotrys chartarum and is extremely dangerous to human beings. It is said to be toxic because it produces toxins known as mycotoxins. Recognizing toxic black mold: It is greenish-black in color and gelatinous in texture with a slimy layer on the surface. What are the symptoms of reaction to black mold? Among the most common risks and health effects of mold are allergies. Some of the most common allergy symptoms of mold include runny nose, wheezing, rash, itchy and watery eyes, redness of the eyes and coughing. Mold also irritates the airways and eyes and skin and causes fever and respiratory problems. Those with low immune systems or chronic lung disease can develop serious lung infections due to mold allergy. Other reactions to black mold include damage to internal organs, mental damage, exhaustion and nausea. In extreme cases, it can also be fatal. How to remove black mold on wood There are many ways of killing black mold that appears on wood. Here are some of them: After cleaning the mildew of its spores, using a vacuum cleaner with a hose, soft brush and HEPA filter will go a long way to get rid of loose spores. Throw all the spores into a plastic bag and put it in your trash can. You can also wash wood with water and a washcloth. Spray the water on the affected parts and rub vigorously with the cloth. Wipe with a paper towel. To get rid of mold on outdoor wooden furniture, rinse it with a garden hose and wipe it dry with a sponge so that no dirt or dust remains. You can also use a solution of dishwashing detergent and warm water and apply it to your wooden furniture. Brush it vigorously with a scrub. If it persists, make a vinegar solution and apply it to your stubborn mold stains. Sanding the wood is another way of getting rid of...

Read More
4 Disadvantages Of Rough Sawn Lumber And How You Can Work Around It
Feb13

4 Disadvantages Of Rough Sawn Lumber And How You Can Work Around It

Though you may have heard the term ‘rough sawn lumber,’ it’s quite likely that you don’t really know what that means. So, let’s define it. Really, this refers to lumber that isn’t yet finished before it’s shipped to be sold. It is kept rough intentionally and must be dried, planed or dressed as the recipient wishes. What exactly happens is that lumber when processed at a mill, sawing it of its roughness is an early step at a time when the boards of the tree haven’t been planed or dried. It continues to be green when shipped, proving that it has neither dried nor cured. So, it will shrink later as it contains 20% water and must be dried under the sun before use. Because it is yet to shrink, it is larger than its finished counterpart, leaving enough room for planing and smoothing. People prefer to by this lumber as it’s relatively inexpensive and it allows them to have greater control. Advantages of using rough sawn lumber: This lumber is usually sold cheaper than finished lumber. It is also thicker than finished wood. It allows the woodworker to have enough wood for a good margin of error, while also saving money. DIY woodworkers and hobbyists prefer rough sawn lumber for their projects as it is economical and they can work with quality wood. It is ideal for a large spectrum of furniture-making. Since it isn’t milled, this kind of wood can give a really rustic feel. This type of wood creates less of an environmental impact since it is only air-dried. Usually, exotic woods that bear rich hues and designs are always rough sawn.  Disadvantages of using rough sawn lumber: It is difficult to work with. It needs to be milled before use. Care must be taken to buy it before it dries completely. Professionals at the lumber mill should let you know if the wood you buy needs to be stacked, interspersed with sticks for drying, or if they need to be kept erect. This means that you can’t work with this wood immediately but only after all the moisture leaves it. Finding a distributor: Your first point of contact to source rough sawn lumber is your local woodworkers’ association. They will recommend distributors and dealers who will give you the lumber you want. Choosing the best rough sawn lumber: Rough sawn lumber needs a lot preparation before it can be used for woodworking projects. Usually, lumber cuts of two-by-four are taken which translate into 1.5 inches x 3.5 inches. To begin, your tool kit and carpentry skills should be ready to use. The advantage of buying this...

Read More